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support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
about late in life was his role in the u.s.-mexico border of 1846. grant said at the time i do not think there was ever more wicked were then that waged by the united states of mexico. i thought so at the time when i was the dexter, only i had not moral courage enough to resign. during the time of the u.s.-mexico war, i just found this are really moving "which is why it took it for my title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. wanted to talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s.-mexico war from being with it -- really enthusiastic and in favor to largely turning against the war. i see the u.s.-mexico war as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. there was anti-war sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happen is a consensus across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field to officers, politicians, all the
on the first part of that. >> democracy now! questions u.s. climate negotiator jonathan pershing about criticism of the failure to do more to cut emissions and save the planet from catastrophic climate change. we will speak with ronny jumeau and martin khor of the south centre in malaysia, and then anjali appadurai. >> you have been negotiating my whole life, you have failed to meet targets and a broken promises. >> a year after calling on world figures to do more to save the planet, the 22-year-old american college student was banned from the climate talks here in doha for the first week. she joins us today h. then we look at how the koch brothers are influencing climate policy.politic this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the death toll from a massive typhoon in the southern philippines has doubled to more than 270 people. typhoon bopha is the most southerly typhoon ever recorded in the western pacific and the strongest to hit the philippines this year. 80,000 people have been forced to flee their homes. we will have more from doha after
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to c
to talk about today is my most recent book, "a wicked war: polk, clay, lincoln, and the 1846 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title dream to is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from the thinnest i've come across back in everything he did then in his career and this number as he writes frankly about experiences he's had, the good in the bad and it makes for good reading. but one thing that grant spent some time together talking about in his life was his role in the u.s.-mexico war of 1846. grant said at the time, i do not think there is a more wicked words and outraged by the united states and mexico. so at the time when as a youngster, only he had not wrote urging us to resign and grant during the time that the u.s.-mexico war was a young lieutenant. i found this a really moving quotes so he took it from a typo. the fact is grant was not allowed in thinking the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow wicked. one thing i talk about in this book and tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of u.s.-mexico war, which is not about word by any means from being really t
, and the 1946 u.s. invasion of mexico." the title, "a wicked war", is taken from a quote from ulysses s. grant. from late in his life, grant look back on his career and in his memoir he writes about the experiences that he had, good and the bad. it makes for good reading. one thing that grant spent some time talking about leaving his wife with his role in the us-mexico border of 1986 -- 1846. >> i found is a very moving quote. the fact of the matter is that grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion of mexico was somehow with it. one thing that i talk about in this book and i will talk about tonight is the evolution of the american public during the course of the u.s. and mexico war, from being really enthusiastic to largely turning against the war. i think the u.s. and mexico war of the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution, and certainly during the war of 1812. that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of th
, the overseas applications of you as two activities either a director in significant effect in the u.s. commerce for the potential for evasion. we support the goals of title vii which provide great transparency and increased oversight of the swaps market. there is growing concern of the cftc and divergence and the sec regarding the process and timing in the house slots and security base wipes are a furry and declines. as the committee is aware, the industry is facing quickly approaching the highest deadline. without the benefit of final payments with the international scope of these rules. the lack of clarity related to the rules cross-border application manifests itself in particular with respect to three aspects. the cftc sdc to more pressing concerns with the requirements. the first is to has to register as a swap deal or. given the nature register, firms of which make decisions if i look so as to which entities to register with the cftc. making these decisions without being fully informed to the rules that apply in literal take to comply and position untenable love love and predict ability.
to be the best of all pleasures to introduce dr. beatrix hoffman to you. she is a leading historian of u.s. health care system. i bet you have been very busy during this political season. with the debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health-care rights, being in the air everywhere we look. as a person addicted to both politics and academic and women's history, i and i'm sure all of us are interested in this presentation so thanks for being here. you couldn't be in a better counter this talky their since much of grand rapids has been very highly invested in the health-care industry, hoping to develop stellar health education, research, innovation in practice, all in the quest for great health-care you. i hope you will be able to see what we call health-care in michigan where so much investment in medical health related work has been made. beatrix hoffman is chair of history at northern illinois. she completed her ph.d. as everyone at my table did at rutgers university in 1996. she has written extensively on the history of
a lot of what we read their is a discussion between u.s. regulators, foreign regulators and often concern on the harmonization between the two, and both the pro methodology use of language because many of us are starting to see a more complex world coming in where others multiple product wrapped in their and if there's a currency okay that might be exempt. there might be a package that actually has from both of you that sort of harmonization really does become important. is there a difference between the way your regulatory bodies are approaching these? >> we have worked together and harmonize on the definitions that you just mentioned about the swaps and mixed swaps and security based swaps so i think the public has a great deal of guidance and the rules but to the extent they need to come back on the package we would address it together. >> mr. cook do you have any incumbent new york city in different approaches is that cultural between the two regulatory bodies? >> i can't speak to the cftc statute but one of the reasons it drove us to the rulemaking in the context is that we l
as well. europe and the u.s. until recently liked to think these dark times were in the past and religious violence was somewhere else, in societies more allegedly primitive, less characterized by heritage of christian values. today we have many reasons to doubt that. our situation calls urgently for critical self examination as we try to uncover the roots of ugly fears and suspicions that currently disfigure all western democracies. in april of 2011 a lot affect in france according to which it is illegal to cover the face in any public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over europe and many countries in regions that adopted some type. on april 28, 2011, the chamber of representativ
, there's another title that many consider a "crowning" achievement. >> being miss teen u.s.a. is an unbelievable dream. >> danielle doty is living the dream -- a dream she's been aiming toward most of her life. >> i had been competing in pageants since i was 7 years old, and i thought, "you know, i'm at the right age." so i was a try?" >> texas! [ cheers and applause ] >> the texas teen won the crown, and now she gets to wear the gown. >> colorful? >> colorful. >> [ laughs ] >> actually, quite a few of them. hers is now a lifestyle jam-packed with red-carpet openings, glitter, and glamour. >> i love this. >> love that. out of these three pieces, i'd say the zipper dress is really amazing, and this is, i mean, just fabulous. >> it looks like fun, but it's also a full-time job. danielle has a calendar filled with good causes...like this one -- project sunshine. it brings a bit of happiness to children with serious illnesses. >> when she comes into the hospital, she just has a light about her and makes the kids smile and makes them feel like a normal kid. >> helping out miss t
turned increasingly desperate. u.s. officials tell nbc news the syrian military has now loaded the precursor chemicals for seron nerve gas into aerial bombs that could be dropped from dozens of syrian fighter bombers. this week u.s. intelligence detected a flurry of activity at chemical weapons site, like this one near homs. while u.s. officials confirmed the precursor chemicals are loaded and they must be mixed together to get the sarin gas. president obama and hillary clinton issued strong warning to syria's president bashar al assad. >> it's the point of no return. they're going to lose any sort of backing they had in terms of the chinese and russians. it's a suicide mission. >> reporter: the killing force of sarin nerve gas is devastating. 5,000 kerds were killed in 1988. >>> well, back here at home, fiscal cliff negotiations in washington are still up in the air. most lawmakers have gone home for a long weekend. this, as treasury secretary timothy geithner says the obama administration is willing to go over the fiscal cliff. nbc's tracie potts joins us live from washington
in cairo and getting assistance from u.s. intelligence agencies. hello, i'm gregg jarrett. >> heather: i'm had heather childers. welcome to a brand-new hour. the suspect has been identified as this man, mohammad jamal amad he was in the process of trying to launch a new affiliated of al-qaeda in egypt, but the focus so his links to the brool attack that killed four americans including our ambassador to libya, christopher stevens. molly henneberg is live in washington. >> molly: he is is a leader in the terror world. he is ambitious. he is very dangerous and now egyptian authorities aided u.s. intelligence have him. they have been tracking for months according to the "wall street journal" and interested in him intensified as some of the followers participated in the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. he was captured within the past week but we don't have many details had in how he was detained. they have not been able to interrogated him yet. he is a former egyptian jihad member. he was released from an egyptian prison in march of 2011. he is now leader of the jamal network and set
rice's because of her comments about that attack on the outpost in benghazi. terrorists killed our u.s. ambassador to it libya chris stevens and three other americans on september 11th of this year. three days later ambassador rice went on the talk show circuit and said several times u.s. officials believed the violence was a spontaneous reaction over protests to anti-muslim video not a preplanned terrorist attack. intelligence officials say they gave her those talking points but those opponents did not back down and today ambassador rice sent the letter to the president, quote: i am now convinced that the confirmation process would be lengthy, disruptive and costly to you and to our most pressing national and international priorities. that tradeoff is simply not worth it to our country, end quote. we have team fox coverage now. catherine herridge is live on capitol hill where lawmakers got another classified briefing on benghazi today. first though to ed henry live at the white house. ed, what's the reaction there? good evening, harris. there is disappointment here because i said ove
of its spies in the u.s. must be released first. >> the united states government refuses with the cuban government to achieve a solution. >> when senator cardinal was asked about that on cbs. >> they're totally different cases. what cuba has to do is release alan gross. >> that doesn't mean they can't sit down and try and talk again and again and try until they reach something. >> what might break the stalemate is the end of the presidential campaign. mr. obama carried florida's cuban america vote. they want the white house to take it. >> the administration has been visited by us to make it clear that this needs to be a high priority. we got to get alan gross back. >> alan gross is 63 years old and his family says he has health problems. he is serving a 15 year prison sentence. >> thanks so much. those five cubans were arrested in the u.s. in 1998. the castro government admits they were spying, but refers to them as heros. >>> anti-apartheid icon nelson mandella has been admit today a hospital in south africa. mandella is undergoing
by the u.s. state department, the number of russian children adopted by american couples has increased significantly in the last few years. in 2004, the number was more than 5800 compared to only 962 last year. over the last 20 years, americans have are adopted more than 60,000 russian children, more than any other country. >> we remain committed to supporting inter-country adoptions between our two countries. the welfare of children is too important to be linked to political aspects of our relationship. >> reporter: the bottom line, says this expert, it is ultimately the children who will suffer because there aren't enough families in russia willing to adopt. >> there are, by some estimates, 700, 750,000 children in orphanages, in institutions in russia. they don't have that many families stepping up. >> reporter: the need is especially great for children with special needs like vatali. >> we rely on our faith and hope in jesus christ and that's what is going to get us through this. but it would just be devastating for those kids. >> reporter: the moyers already have two biological ch
view threaten u.s. interests in africa and require the attention of the government and the world. that's why we convened the hearing to assess and a path forward and stabilize the situation and to address ongoing humanitarian needs. i would like to welcome my friend and partner on the subcommittee senator ikesson and i understand we may well be joined by others and to thank our distinguished witnesses for sharing their insight and expertise. earlier this year, a security and political vacuum was exploited by extremists. today al qaeda and aqim and two affiliated groups control the majority of northern malli an area roughly the size of the state of texas making it the largest territory controlled by islamist extremists in the world. i am concerned the current approach is not comprehensive and forward leaning enough to address all threeze crises, security and plit and humanitarian. today we'll examine the policies. we'll assess evolving plans for a regionly led multilateral intervention and consider the complimentry goals of encouraging elections and restoring security by reclaiming the
this to light tonight. it will take global pressure to get the pastor released this, u.s. citizen, i should also say, released from iranian jail. >> sean: we will continue to monitor it. i hope you can get him home by christmas. thank you for being with us. we wish you all the best, you and your family. >> thank you, sean. >> sean: that's all the time we have -- left. thanks for being with us. greta's next. see you back here tomorrow night. greta. >> sean. >> tonight, yes, of course, the state department admits it was wrong, but, have they really answered all the questions? >> the independent panel review of benghazi is out and you know what? >> mistakes were made, lives were lost, lessons need to be learned. >> it says that mistakes were made. >> the state department clearly failed the boy scout motto of be prepared. >> there is no question that there were people within the state department that -- were remiss and did not execute in an appropriate way. >> just in to the fox newsroom, it appears heads are starting to roll after that benghazi report issued late yesterday -- >> there were mistakes
business is looking good for 2013, but going over the fiscal cliff could change that. >> tom: and the u.s. treasury speeds up plans to sell its stake in general motors. is the automaker ready to stand alone? >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: under the threat of a white house veto, the u.s. house of representatives is expected to vote tomorrow on the republican plan-b to avoid the fiscal cliff. house speaker john boehner thinks the house will okay the package, trying to turn the heat up on president obama to steer clear of automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts due to take affect in 12 days. still, as darren gersh reports, there are some signs the two sides are narrowing their differences. >> reporter: house republicans say they're still working on plan a: a big agreement with the president to cut spending and raise revenues, but they were pushing plan b today-- a tax hike for those making more than a million dollars. >> tomorrow the house will pass legislation to make permanent tax relief for nearly every american. 99.81% of the american people. then the presi
u.s. citizens from adopting russian children. the decision raising tensions between the two countries, seen for retaliation for a new law in the u.s. that seeks to punish russians for human rights violations. the ban will take effect on january 1st, that's really right away it would halt all new adoptions and end those already in progress. incredible. a lot of families in the process of adopting children in russia. >> those poor kids. >>> want to move on to the weather. lots of snow, wind, hail everywhere across the u.s. the storm that brought snow and spun off tornadoes is still not over. ten deaths blamed on the storm. more than 2,400 flights have been canceled. it could dump more snow on new england and upstate new york today. boy, they don't need that. bonnie schneider with a look at the forecast. good morning. >> good morning. the storm we've been talking about is working its way to extreme northeastern new england. it is hitting canada hard. quebec is getting more snow. i mentioned yesterday that cold air would come in behind the system. it sure has. scranton at 26. be
deliver a major boost to u.s. economic growth. i realize that many of our colleagues have different priorities when it comes to fixing our broken immigration system, but the reforms contained in the stem jobs act enjoy bipartisan support. so i would urge my colleagues, let's show the world that we can agree on this common sense, bipartisan immigration reform. let's do something for our economy and let's take this first step in our broken -- solving our broken immigration system. now, let me say, before i turn the floor over to my colleague from kentucky, who i know has some comments on this topic, let me address two issues quickly and that is, i can anticipate hearing from some of our colleagues, this doesn't solve all of what's broken in our immigration system and i concede that that's correct. but what we need more than anything is to develop some confidence-building measures for the american people to demonstrate that we can come together, republicans and democrats alike, and do what needs to be done, which everybody -- almost everybody agrees is common sense, and then we can fol
business from what goes on in the u.s. economy? >> probably not. i'm bullish in the auto business and the building trades, but that is not going to be enough to offset the fiscal cliff, and we're going to have to manage europe at the same time. >> susie: let's say there is no deal and the u.s. economy really slows down, or as some people say could go into a recession, how are you preparing for that possibility? >> we're trying to make those investments that are strategic, and holding back on our hiring because we don't know the growth rates. we're probably looking at the different ways to reduce our points from a logical standpoint, and we're trying to pull every lever to give us some latitude and leverage. >> susie: what deal would you like to see come out of washington? what would be best for your company? >> probably making certain that the tax increases don't go all the way down to the middle class. i think we've just got to make sure the majority of people can still protect their me net pay right now. my biggest concern is -- what the government could do is make sure that the
to corporate employees. foreign hackers constantly target u.s. companies in such ways in order to get every piece of competitive intelligence information they can. we simply cannot allow this to continue to happen. in response to this growing threat in our 2011 annual report, the u.s. intellectual property coordinator called upon congress to increase the penalties for economic espionage and this bill is consistent with that recommendation. i would like to commend the members of both sides of the aisle for their work on this bill, particularly the gentleman from texas, the chair of the committee, mr. smith, the ranking member, the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, the incoming chair of the judiciary committee, my colleague from virginia, mr. goodlatte and the gentleman from north carolina, mr. watt, who worked diligently on this bill and i recognize the leadership of senator lay high and i -- leahy. and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is -- the gentleman from texas -- mr. scott: i yield ba
in the treaty that interferes with u.s., federal or state laws, nothing. that didn't stop mr. santorum to send out this e-mail to supporters after the vote saying you did it. you made it happen. if it weren't for you, the u.s. senate wouldn't have defeated the united nations convention on the rights of person with disability. he went on to say, quote, this treaty would have given the u.n. oversight of the health care and education choices parents with special needs kids make. had it passed, crpd would have been the law of the land under the u.s. constitution supremacy clause and trumped state laws and could have been used as precedent by state and federal judges. again, that's not true. why the fudging of facts? we asked senator santorum on the program tonight. he declined, and like the others that won't explain themselves, we can guess their motivations and frankly it's so baffling we're taking wide guesses and we don't want to do that. the treaty supporters say that politics and a paranoia about the u.n. trumped the rights of the disabled in this vote. ted kennedy jr. is a health care attorn
the stunning military operation and the u.s. navy s.e.a.l. who heroically gave his life to help save a doctor kidnapped by the taliban. nbc's jim has the story. >>> he was a highly decorated navy veteran killed sunday in afghanistan. the s.e.a.l.s set out to rescue an american relief worker dr. dilip joseph kidnapped last week on the road east of kabul. joseph was held hostage at an enemy complex in laghman province. as they approached the compound on foot, they came under intense enemy fire, from ak 478s, heavy machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades. in the fierce battle the petty officer took a single bullet and later died from his wound. in the heat of that battle they miraculously rescued dr. joseph. he had earned a bronze star and two other awards. he's a native of monroeville, pennsylvania. he was widely admired by coaches and classmates alike. >> i remember nick real well. he was one of those guys you loved to have on your team. >> and he's a special, special person, so he won't be forgotten. >> reporter: dr. joseph works with an american relief organization morningstar providing f
rebels close in on damascus, the syrian regime has turned increasingly desperate. u.s. officials tell nbc news the syrian military has now loaded the precursor chemicals for seron nerve gas into aerial bombs that could be dropped from dozens of syrian fighter bombers. this week u.s. intelligence detected a flurry of activity at chemical weapons site, like this one near homs. while u.s. officials confirmed the precursor chemicals are loaded and they must be mixed together to get the sarin gas. president obama and hillary clinton issued strong warning to syria's president bashar al assad. >> it's the point of no return. they're going to lose any sort of backing they had in terms of the chinese and russians. it's a suicide mission. >> reporter: the killing force of sarin nerve gas is devastating. 5,000 kerds were killed in 1988. >>> well, back here at home, fiscal cliff negotiations in washington are still up in the air. most lawmakers have gone home for a long weekend. this, as treasury secretary timothy geithner says the obama administration is willing to go over the fiscal cliff. nbc's tr
to be played out where the u.s.' cooperation re-- creates resentment. it gives this very strange dynamic and insight into the impact that history is having into that area because this is part of the world that has been used to coming and going and create a relationship and hedge their bet. apart from the human tragedies that are in there, your heart breaks. and spoke to his wife right before he went on this mission and died in a helicopter crash and it reminds you of the human cost of this effort and logistical challenges of the effort. >> did this book make you regret or an approach on afghanistan? >> it reminds us of the challenges of it. at the end of the day, afghanistan is important and important for multiple reasons. you don't want to create a safe haven in afghanistan for people to be able to come back and reconstitute the taliban. but it's also about pakistan. to an unstable afghanistan where elements are organized is a danger to pakistan and its nuclear capability and they are concerned about that as well. the raid against bin laden couldn't have happened. the future matters in
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
source, howard dean. does the former vermont governor's plan add up? plus, a former u.s. navy sailor charged with attempted espy naj tonight. the alleged benefactor was russia. the war on drugs? have we lost it? let's go "outfront." good evening. a bright idea brought to us by the liberal former governor of vermont, howard dean. the man who brought us the scream heard round the world when he ran for president. yeah! >> dean says let's face it, america. taxes need to go up for everyone. now, this might not be what you expect from someone like howard dean. it's certainly not the president's position or the position of most americans. another new poll out today shows most people like the president's ideas of only raising taxes on other people, specifically the top 2%. individuals making over $200,000 a year or families making over $250,000 a year. the problem is according to the congressional research service, the math doesn't add up. that tax hike would give $678 billion in additional revenue over ten years. remember, we're $16 trillion in the debt hole. if we go with howard dean's ide
. hammar told u.s. border officials in texas that he wanted to take with him his great grandfather's antique gun and those officials told hammar no problem. but when he got to mexico. border agents locked him unon violation charges of the country's strict gun laws and since then his parents and lawmakers have been working feverishly to get him out. on friday this marine who served us in iraq and afghanistan and also suffers from prost thattatic stress disorder was greed. he and his dad drove back from florida and hours ago after they arrived home in palmetto bay steve harrigan was live there and had a chance to talk to the dad. steve, how is the family doing tonight? >> jamie, we got to see john hammar pull up with his father after this long ordeal. they drove directly into the garage. john hammar is now suffering from some sort of stomach ailment he picked up inside that mexican prison. they actually had to make a stop on the drive home from the border at a louisiana hospital and john hammar's father says his son is so weak he can barely stand despite that, he says, this will be t
there in dallas, where he will spotlight the positive impact of immigration on u.s. economic growth. this as the g.o.p. looks to attract more hiss to the party. meantime mr. bush's father, former president george h.w. bush is spending another day in the hospital being treated for bronchitis and a lingering cough. we told you about that last week when we first found out that he was there. the 88-year-old former president is in stable condition. no record on when he is to be released. ab stoddard is a former editor for the hill. bush 43 has been fairly quiet throughout the first term of the obama administration. now the president has been reelected, george w. bush sort of comes out a little bit to make this big address, why? what is the timing about, do you think? >> i think the timing was shrewd. he really made a point of staying quiet during the first couple of years of president obama's administration, saying that he wanted the about the to be able to do his job, he didn't think he needed a former president to go out there and do somed tore ra some editorializing. he gave some peaches, enjoyed hi
to pay $1,250 and serve a year of supervision. u.s. baird jail time because this is his first offense. metra trains will soon be equipped with additional safety measures. the agency plans to put 300- defibrillators on commuter trains. they'll be installed in all metra trains by next month. metra facilities and police vehicles will also get the devices. experts say having the defibrillators on board could mean life or death for travellers who suffer a cardiac arrest. the defibrillators are already available in about half of metra trains. students are using how they brick to rest and relax a bunch of others are preparing dilapidated auditoriums at several schools. more on the project. >> hanging out, staying out late sleeping in. not these kids. they're hard at work learning new skills and learning some extra money. >> it started with the metal and black. then we go into the ground. then we do a nice little stain. she is one of 40 students taking part in the auditorium seeding project. a community organization hired students to repair dilapidated auditoriums at various schools throug
's going on. also later, new warnings that the u.s. should be prepared to intervene in syria's civil war. senator john mccain now says he's deeply disturbed by the latest reports that the current regime in damascus is preparing to use chemical weapons against its own people. >> these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of an imminent use of weapons of mass destruction. year-end event. so, the 5.3-liter v8 silverado can tow up to 9,600 pounds? 315 horsepower. what's that in reindeer-power? [ laughs ] [ pencil scratches ] [ male announcer ] chevy's giving more. get the best offer of the year -- 0% apr financing for 60 months plus $1,000 holiday bonus cash. plus trade up for an additional $1,000 trade-in allowance. hurry. bonus cash ends january 2nd. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are str
for new jersey. wait. isn't he a fiscal hawk? plus, syrian president accuses the u.s. of manufacturing stories as a pretext for an invasion. leon panetta responds tonight and a day after john mcagree is taken into custody, he was rush to the hospital. we'll be back. everything hase just right. perfection is in the details. ♪ get to holiday fun faster with pillsbury cookie dough. i have a cold... i took dayquil, but i still have a runny nose. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast acting antihistamine to relieve your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] can't find theraflu? try alka-seltzer plus for fast, liquid, cold, and flu relief. try alka-seltzer plus meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. when you're carrying a lot of weight, c-max has a
2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to your comments today. thanks for being here. [applause] >> thank you. well, thank you. i really appreciate the opportunity from each one of you. our nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're
fit and she stays active. >> just part of a taxpayer funded ad campaign from the u.s. department of agriculture encouraging seniors to get on food stamps because they will make you look better. we have more news on the food stamp front that will make you angry and that's later in the show. with the tax and fiscal cliff looming 21 days from now, is there a reason for even some slight optimism this evening? joining us now in studio, we welcome distinguished house members carolina maloney of new york and larry kudlow's house member in manhattan. and the republican from arizona. as always, welcome to both of you. dave, let me ask you this. i'm hearing a lot of this that there is a strategic retreat by the republican party. 57b and that they are not either in the house or senate going to block the middle class stax tax cuts which proliferate in terms of the bill. is that true, sir? >> i haven't been invited into the strategic retreat caucus. look. i hear more on the news than i ever actually come across in reality in d.c. so far, i do not see a willingness, particularly on the conserv
that divides russian society. but make no mistake, it is a power play. it's a response to that u.s. act, as you mentioned, a law signed by obama a couple of weeks ago intended to penalize, sanction russian officials connected with this particular custody case and this tax evasion case in russia. >> so matthew, this law would go into effect january 1st. is there any chance that those cases that are pending where the paperwork is finalized and where people are expecting their children, essentially, in a month or two would be allowed to go through? >> well, there is a question mark hanging over those. there are 52 children, according to the kremlin, that are in the middle of this adoption process with u.s. parents. the law, as you say, starts on january the 1st, but it's only a couple of days until then. so unless that can be finalized, my expectation is that that will be put on hold and indeed that's what russian officials are saying, that they don't think this law has been enacted from january the 1st, these children should be allowed to go to the united states. instead there's been a call for r
: merry christmas. press zones and spending time in a louisiana hospital, u.s. marine veteran john hammar is on his way home just in time for christmas. good morning everyone, i'm greg jat in for. >> i'm martha maccallum. after spending for four months in prison in mexico on a questionable gun charge. hammar was arrested when he tried to cross the border with a antique shotgun his family said was an heirloom. steve harrigan is live. >> reporter: after four long months the 27-year-old former marine was released from the notorious prison late friday night after several hours of paperwork. he was accompanied by u.s. consular officials from the border between mexico and texas. he met his father and the two began the drive home. they had to stop off yesterday in a hospital in louisiana room in louisiana, john hammar suffering from the stomach flu. having trouble keeping food down. the goal was to get him home for christmas. looks like it will happen now. heather? >> steve, quite an ordeal for the family to say the very least >> reporter: a very tough time. they received threats, ex-torgs attem
for calling. a live picture of the u.s. capitol. 7:23 in washington. some heavy rain and perhaps some snow. a. when terry mix are expecting in town. we mention that because the president is heading back into town. the senate and white house -- the senate and house are due back tomorrow. this is an politico. there is another piece of this morning that says the house member elect is also interested in the peak in the seat -- adapter the seat. springfield, va., lewis, an independent. caller: good morning. you could consider me a little bit pessimistic. i am actually looking at it as realistically as possible. i have a degree in macroeconomics. i believe that they all should be -- we should institute term limits on all of them. maybe a six-year term limit. they're all thinking of reelection. host: both sides? caller: yes. they are thinking about re- election with the country is almost $70 trillion in debt. -- $17 trillion. people and businesses are giving out payouts because taxes are going up on everyone. it does not matter -- there are too many taxes going up. payroll taxes going up. we do not
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